Thinking | Teaching | Talking: September 2021

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TTT - September 2021


  1. What's next for personal productivity via justindirose.com

  2. Field Notes of a Sentence Watcher via hedgehogreview.com

  3. Lost perspective? Try this linguistic trick to reset your view via psyche.co

  4. Too much free time may be almost as bad as too little via apa.org

  5. How NFTs are building the internet of the future | Kayvon Tehranian via TEDTalks (video)

  6. 50 years ago, the first CT scan let doctors see inside a living skull – thanks to an eccentric engineer at the Beatles' record company via The Conversation

  7. Find your sleep 'sweet spot' to protect your brain as you age, study suggests CNN.com - Top Stories

  8. Facebook is Other People via kevinmunger.substack.com

  9. What Are the Four Productivity Styles? How to Identify Yours via MakeUseOf

  10. Climate vs. Weather: What’s the Difference?  via Discover Magazine

  11. How drawing invites authentic connection | Wendy MacNaughton via TEDTalks (video)

  12. The 5 Rs of Note Taking via aliabdaal.com

  13. Mindfulness: New age craze or science-backed solution? via Big Think Expert Ideas

  14. Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting via The Next Web

  15. Try this technique to learn just about anything (even the complex stuff) via Fast Company

  16. Aiming for 10,000 steps? It turns out 7,000 could be enough to cut your risk of early death viaThe Conversation

  17. Friday Essay: an introduction to Confucius, his ideas and their lasting relevance The Conversation

  18. We Have to Talk About Doubt via Nautilus

  19. 30 Psychological Tricks That “Blew People’s Minds” When They First Learned Them via Bored Panda

  20. I’ll Tell You the Secret of Cancer via Health : The Atlantic

  21. It’s all too easy to be offended by an innocent work email — but there are ways to avoid it via The Conversation